Kindness

Kindness

Be kind to one another, for those great burdens that weigh heavy on your mind and are carried through your days look quite similar to the burdens of your neighbor. Perhaps not. Perhaps yours are more complicated or more contained, larger than your arms can hold or stuffed into a backpack for long-term travel. Maybe your burdens are new or old, hairy or smelly or itchy or odd. But look next door and you’ll see that they’re the same, if you’ll let yourself believe that, if you’ll do yourself the favor (and your neighbor too).

I let myself cry today because the air felt safe and appropriate and true. Water spilled over the edge of my face mask in a hospital room that has grown too familiar; with a hidden smile, my eyes reveal all. I felt thankful for the kindness those around me offered, to allow the mystery of tears, to even share in it. My burdens seem so big to me; I know yours do as well to you. And they are. And I see that. So I plead with you to be kind to one another. For the world needs a ballooning of grace and joy and kindness to glide through the sky and overcome temporary, sorrowful burdens below.

For every bullet point on my gratitude list, I feel as if three more arise to oppose. On tough days, I’m too tired to bother. But kindness pulls me through. It can pull us through together if we’ll let it.

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Buzzing

Buzzing

It feels like tears welling when I think too much and when I think too little. It feels like closing the door to keep it all, everything, out there and simultaneously yearning for someone to open the door, all the while knowing that if they do I don’t have the words to explain why I closed the door in the first place. It feels like being the outsider even though my name entitles me to this home, even though this home has felt to be just that for years before. It feels like a buzzing in my ears instead of the clear articulations spoken by the ones in front of me. What did you say again? It feels like trying to refocus again and again and again. It feels like forgotten prayers or even prayers that never come, like words that sit heavily on my eyelids, coaxing me to sleep, and then waking in the morning with hopes that God is a mind or dream-reader, surely he has known all along. It feels like going to bed too early and rising too late, with muscles that ache from the exercise I never got, with doughy guilt sitting in my gut expanding more and more. It feels like a silent house is yelling at me. It feels like Fear and Anxiety are my best friends, more loyal than I can comprehend. It feels like fingers crossed that I will not be noticed or addressed directly. It’s a discomfort that I want to describe to you, but as soon as my voice leaves my tongue, that sing-song speech well-practiced and fine-tuned, to meet your eyes, I know you have misunderstood. My depths are not your depths. I’ve confused you with my disguises so I leave it be again.

I want to live everywhere

I want to live everywhere

If money were no object, I would be nonstop on the move. (you too, right?) There is an uneasiness that lives deep within me, an ever-present itch to plan, move, travel, and see. It took mere days after our California adventure (enough sleep to overcome the redeye headed east and enough organized thought to throw our photos together in an album) for me to start the imaginative process again: what next? I would like to chop it up to wanderlust, to attribute this constant motion to a sundress on a sunny afternoon, carefree kind-of attitude. But most days it feels more like a fear of missing out, discontentment with the ordinary, oversized sense of pressure. This feeling that tells me if I’m not constantly pressing harder, working harder, trying harder, I must be failing. The one that tells me that back porch sitting is time poorly wasted, that nearby cafes and first-name-basis baristas are overrated, that walking to the neighborhood playground is mundane, that being born and raised and still anywhere is boring. Y’all, I am so wrong.

Today my husband text me I want to live everywhere, and I smiled because I know he said it for me. He said it because I have a heart bursting with dreams, driven by goals, yearning for simplicity while fighting off the enemy of wanting more. My prayers sound like a mind game. Please help me find contentment. Please help me to want to find contentment.

The Emotional Ones

The Emotional Ones

Weddings feel like goodbyes. Let me say from the beginning that I do not disapprove of weddings, for I am secretly one of the Emotional Ones, the ones who will feel all the feels, both joy and sorrow, while hiding my teary eyes with sunglasses and a smile. Though my natural pull may be more inclined to notice the sorrowful, weddings are certainly some of the most joy-filled days in our lives, and my heart is so grateful for what the covenant of marriage means. The sacrifice of self and the promise of overflowing love point us to the beautiful and bigger love of Jesus. And I will say it a million times over: that marriage, though challenging and soul-struggling at times, gives me a small glimpse into that beautiful and bigger love, that hope for eternity. My heart is full of gratitude for the opportunity to watch my brother take that leap of faith over the weekend. But even with so much goodness, weddings still feel like saying goodbye. Goodbye to yesterday, to the person you were. Goodbye to roommates and twin beds, to a family of five, four, three, or two; so long to simplicity of holiday scheduling. To an identity you’ve clung to or maybe despised. Maybe it’s goodbye to dreams that dissolved into greater desires. To putting your own self first. To the luxury of disregarding your own messes. It’s goodbye to two people who will surely come back different and changed, beneath the surface, in ways even they cannot be sure of just yet. Some goodbyes can be so enriching, so life changing, so good deep down. Weddings feel like goodbyes because the event marks another milestone, acts as a reminder of this trip of a lifetime continuing to carry us forward at what feels like light speed, into unknowns and new identities.

. . . . .

His bride was walking down the aisle, and he couldn’t take his eyes off her. I couldn’t take my eyes off him. I watched as he and our other brother stood at the altar, both with teary eyes, reminding me that being one of the Emotional Ones is more than okay, too worthy to say goodbye to.

Country boy vs. librarian

Country boy vs. librarian

I’m sitting at the public library trying to work but mostly listening to Good Ol’ Country Boy talk Librarian’s ear off. She responds to his long trivial sentences with one word, sometimes no word at all but only a hmmm of acknowledgement. She sounds beyond bored. I myself have looked over at him at least four times, as if to say this is a library and you’re speaking too loudly. He doesn’t catch on. Did you hear about all the trees down after the storm out on Henderson road? Did you know that he and Jimmy can never act serious together, that it’s just not possible? Did you hear that Bertie has cancer again, this time worse than the first? I cringe at Librarian’s disinterest, ashamed at my own annoyance. I feel her pain, her inability to hand this unwelcome conversationalist off to another person. I, too, am Librarian.

I write out a text supposing that perhaps stronger friendships may relieve some of my ongoing feelings of anxiety.

I see you Good Ol’ Country Boy. I am you too.

Blackberry freezer jam

Blackberry freezer jam

We finished your blackberry freezer jam today. I stood at the kitchen window, in our new home, no longer the one that your family dug deep roots in for decades, but I can still feel your presence. I sometimes still find your grandson with tears streaming down, missing his grandparents. I still imagine you at your own kitchen window, the center of a room where you spent hours preparing meals for your family, meals I know we all wish could be eaten one more time. I still remember you later sitting in your daughter’s kitchen, those big hugs you offered, those jokes you would crack, those smiles you shared. It’s been two years, and we just now finished your jam, still so sweet and fresh, like memories. We found it tucked away in your chest freezer, along with other frozen goodies, excitement in our eyes, anticipation for such a yummy treat. You have fed us over and over again for the past two years. I like to think you knew the importance of taking care of your family, even from afar. A simple gift with such big meaning. We finished your blackberry freezer jam today, and though the jar may be empty, our bellies and hearts are so full.

The act of unsettling

The act of unsettling

The moment I begin to settle into the silence of the house when I’m alone, I also begin settling into the uneasiness. That previously unheard creak magnifies and echoes in my ears. Since when does the dishwasher make a noise like that? And can anyone really be sure that the air conditioner is responsible for those sounds that are so similar to an axe murderer stealthily unlocking my backdoor?

Did I say settling?

Clearly I meant unsettling. The act of unsettling is so easy when others are nowhere nearby. And clearly my loaf of a kitten-cat is completely useless in fighting off the bad guys. And so I turn on every light in my house. And I refuse to walk by the back door or even make eye contact with a window. Don’t ask me to take a single step down the basement stairs. I stick close to my kitten-cat for the rhythm of his snoring and the soft sound of a heartbeat, no matter how lazy. I snuggle up to the uncertainty of a home all alone. I attempt to make peace with this invisible friend of uncomfortable. Thoughts tend to grow lavishly if not kept in check. Truth and not truth become blurry, their colors mixing into a magnificent shade of gray, like tonight’s cloudy night sky.

Friendship is good and important, faithful and calming.